How to Make Ghee

I make ghee regularly to have on hand at home. It’s got a great flavor and a high heat point so is perfect for cooking eggs or sautéing brussel sprouts for LCHF and keto. Since it removes the milk protein, ghee is Whole30 approved.

Here’s my latest batch.

Another advantage is that it is stable at room temperature for several weeks or longer, especially in these small mason jars which seal as they cool. This makes it great for camp cooking in the RV.

I’ve also started making flavored ghee. Here are my recent creations of garlic-basil and turmeric-curry. They have a great through and through flavor. Notice that the ghee solidifies and becomes opaque when it is stored in the refrigerator.

Ghee is very easy to make. Below is an article to walk you through the steps.

I’ve started using a thick bottomed tea kettle to boil the ghee. It keeps the bottom for scorching as easily and, if you’re careful, allows for you to pour off the ghee directly into the containers without straining it.

Finally, I have two bits of advice. First, don’t turn up the heat too high or the solids at the bottom can create a strong scorched nutty flavor. Second, leave it alone until it froths up a second time. It won’t be ready until then.

Hope you enjoy it as much as I do!

Learn how to make ghee (aka liquid gold), how long homemade ghee lasts, and what its health benefits are.
— Read on www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/recipe-collections-favorites/popular-ingredients/how-to-make-ghee

Eat real food.

Anyone that’s looked at my Wellness Prescription handout knows that the first step of good nutrition is to eat real food. After that, we need to engineer a low enough carbohydrate diet to achieve our health goals. Typically, I recommend newbies start at 100gms per day, but I always individualize that level with each patient at their office visit and adjust it as they grow in experience and success.

With all the reaction to the new ‘low carb is killing you’ study, I liked what cardiologist Aseem Malhotra, MD had to say about it during a recent interview. Essentially, eating fake food is always not good for you even if you are generally low carb. However, real food that is low carb is the best of all. If you don’t know what that is or how to implement it in your life, come see us at Trinity DPC. We talk about this stuff all the time.

We have two upcoming ‘Food as Medicine’ discussions that are free for members and $20 a person for non-members.  Carly Slagle, RD and Dr. Hone are hosting a meeting in Maryville on August 23rd from 12 to 1pm.  In Hardin Valley, Carly and I will be hosting a discussion on September 4th from 1 to 2pm.  Call our office you have any questions.