As a kid, I grew up drinking orange juice from time to time. I always found it one of the most refreshing drinks when I was really thirsty. As I learned more about carbohydrates and their impact on my body, I came to realize that the fast acting nature of a fruit juice drink could be harmful. Now to be fair from the onset, I teach my patients an appropriately low enough carb, whole food nutritional plan that, if followed from an early age, might include naturally occurring fruit like an orange. I’m not anti-fruit or even anti-carb as it is a complex question to answer. I even spent about 30 minutes one afternoon in the middle of Food City answering my then 9 year old daughter’s simple question “Is orange juice healthy?” That being said, I spent so many years of my life eating Poptarts and Crunch Berries that I must be more deliberate about my choices now as a consequence. What is the perfect human diet? That may be different than the diet a particular patient may need to correct the metabolic damage done. The principles remain the same but the details might be different.

In my case, I’ve written before that during my four years of medical residency I was on call every 3rd or 4th night spending about 36 hours straight in the hospital. Making a meager salary, I depended on the meal stipend of $9 per 36 hour shift to get me through those long stints. One wilted, slightly too warm salad was $8.50 and only available at lunch time. However, a package of frosted brown sugar and cinnamon Poptarts was $0.85 all night long. I ‘needed’ the emotional reward anyway. It was easy to justify.

8 ounces of all natural deliciousness?

This morning I decided to try orange juice again since I’m wearing my Freestyle Libre continuous glucose monitor. In a fasted state, I had 8 ounces of all natural, 100% fruit juice with no added sugar orange juice. Pulp free, of course, because I’m not a sociopath. So, is orange juice healthy?

As bad as pancakes

You can see from my monitor report how well controlled my glucose was overnight while fasted. The slight waver noted just before 6am is due to the catecholamine surge that occurs when the alarm clock goes off and I get out of bed. My peak of 160 mg/dL took 31 minutes to occur on the meter which means it was even faster in my blood stream. I might as well be mainlining a glucose solution. This is like going to the beach at noon in the summer time and putting on tan amplifier oil.

The beauty of the CGM is that it automatically tracks the progress of my body sorting and dealing with the excess sugar. It took about 1.5 hours for my system to normalize. During the time of my sugar high I was meeting with some friends for breakfast and I had a hard time concentrating on the topic at hand. Literally, my brain was so foggy that I struggled to remember facts that should have been immediately present on my mind. It was frustrating to say the least. Even now as I write this over 3 hours later I’m still not as clear as I was yesterday when I was still in nutritional ketosis.

Back to normal? Only by the number

So what’s your story? What foods have you had that impacted your glucose numbers? Are there foods you have enjoyed by tradition, culture, or habit that you now realize shouldn’t be a part of your diet? What’s been the impact? I’d love to hear your stories and the lessons you’ve learned. And, if you don’t yet have a CGM, ask your doctor for one. Don’t take ‘no’ for an answer. If they tell you that you don’t qualify for one politely tell them “Well, I have $35 in my pocket and I’m a responsible human interested in my own health, so, yes, I do qualify.”

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