Friday August 2nd was the fourth day of my journey documenting how to achieve nutritional ketosis. So far my dietary intake of net carbs have been 10 gms, 17.6 gms, and 22.5 gms. Yesterday, I had 17.2 gms of net carbs. I’m averaging 16.8 gms of net carbs per day. Not bad, I think.

Breakfast was three eggs, bacon, sausage and cheese with black coffee. Lunch was beef brisket, an avocado, and a tomato with a spoonful of Purely Pecans sea salt pecan butter with unsweet tea. This stuff is very good and is often what I eat with apple slices. At 1.5 net carbs per tablespoon and 12 gms of fat it’s a great low sugar, whole food snack. Breakfast was 5 gms of net carbs and lunch was only 7 gms of net carbs.

I also need to give a shout out to one of my awesome patients who brought me some of the best tomatoes I’ve ever tasted. He came in this week for a routine follow up and we celebrated a reduction of his fasting blood sugar back to normal and a reduction of his fasting insulin by over 50%! Truly unbelievably good work. I’m so proud of you and happy birthday today!

Dinner was a naked hamburger patty topped with cheddar cheese, sauteed mushrooms, diced tomatoes on a bed of baby spinach leaves. Adding another spoonful of pecan butter made the total meal only 5 net carbs.

Again, my glucose readings remained pretty flat all day. This produced a ketone reading of 0.9 mmol/L this morning after fasting overnight. (I forgot to snap a picture of it before leaving the house this morning, whoops).

I’m pleased with this progress. I’ve been able to eat well and feel satisfied while producing a mild nutritional ketosis. My energy level is good and sleep is too. Both are things that I find deepen in their quality when I eat really well.

You may have noticed the dip in my blood glucose around 4-5 am noted in red on the graph above. I don’t have a definitive explanation of that. It could be associated to changes to cortisol and growth hormone levels that usually happen around that time each morning.

I remember that night as being a particularly dream filled night too. While we sleep our metabolic rate isn’t very much lower than when we are awake and REM sleep, where dreams happen, produces brainwave activity similar to doing those same actions while being awake. The brain consumes a large amount of the body’s energy needs at around 16% so it’s possible that my particularly intense dream consumed more glucose than a typical night. It’s also possible that my night time mental activity had nothing to do with my glucose as REM sleep is always dream filled, we just don’t usually remember it as such. Regardless, the dip, I believe, is inconsequential to my overall progress and health. The CGMs don’t measure lows as well as they measure highs and I always take numbers less than 60 gm/dL with a grain of salt.

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